Intro

About

In this first stage, the catalogue focuses on the modern and contemporary architecture designed and built between 1832 –year of construction of the first industrial chimney in Barcelona that we establish as the beginning of modernity– until today.

The project is born to make the architecture more accessible both to professionals and to the citizens through a website that is going to be updated and extended. Contemporary works of greater general interest will be incorporated, always with a necessary historical perspective, while gradually adding works from our past, with the ambitious objective of understanding a greater documented period.

The collection feeds from multiple sources, mainly from the generosity of architectural and photographic studios, as well as the large amount of excellent historical and reference editorial projects, such as architectural guides, magazines, monographs and other publications. It also takes into consideration all the reference sources from the various branches and associated entities with the COAC and other collaborating entities related to the architectural and design fields, in its maximum spectrum.

Special mention should be made of the incorporation of vast documentation from the COAC Historical Archive which, thanks to its documental richness, provides a large amount of valuable –and in some cases unpublished– graphic documentation.

The rigour and criteria for selection of the works has been stablished by a Documental Commission, formed by the COAC’s Culture Spokesperson, the director of the COAC Historical Archive, the directors of the COAC Digital Archive, and professionals and other external experts from all the territorial sections that look after to offer a transversal view of the current and past architectural landscape around the territory.

The determination of this project is to become the largest digital collection about Catalan architecture; a key tool of exemplar information and documentation about architecture, which turns into a local and international referent, for the way to explain and show the architectural heritage of a territory.

Aureli Mora i Omar Ornaque
Directors arquitecturacatalana.cat

credits

About us

Architects' Association of Catalonia:

Àrea de Cultura

Directors:

2019-2022 Aureli Mora i Omar Ornaque

Documental Commission:

2019-2022 Ramon Faura Carolina B. Garcia Francesc Rafat Antoni López Daufí Joan Falgueras Anton Pàmies Mercè Bosch Josep Ferrando Fernando Marzá Aureli Mora Omar Ornaque

External Collaborators:

2019-2022 Lluis Andreu Sergi Ballester Maria Jesús Quintero

With the support of:

Generalitat de Catalunya Departament de Cultura

Collaborating Entities:

ArquinFAD

 

Fundació Mies van der Rohe

 

Fundación DOCOMOMO Ibérico

Design & Development:

Nubilum Edittio
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We kindly invite you to help us improve the dissemination of Catalan architecture through this space. Here you can propose works and provide or amend information on authors, photographers and their work, along with adding comments. The Documentary Commission will analyze all data. Please do only fill in the fields you deem necessary to add or amend the information.

The Arxiu Històric del Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya is one of the most important documentation centers in Europe, which houses the professional collections of more than 180 architects whose work is fundamental to understanding the history of Catalan architecture. By filling this form, you can request digital copies of the documents for which the Arxiu Històric del Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya manages the exploitation of the author's rights, as well as those in the public domain. Once the application has been made, the Arxiu Històric del Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya will send you an approximate budget, which varies in terms of each use and purpose.

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Memory

The 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games, beyond the merely sporting and urban, represented for the city the recovery of its history, which was interrupted in 1936. It has been the most important event in recent times, thanks to which the city has regained its former splendor. That is why the Olympic Stadium was renamed with the name of the martyred president, Lluís Companys. From this wish of uniting the past with the present, the idea of reconstructing the Spanish pavilion that the Republic commissioned for the 1937 International Exhibition in Paris was born. This pavilion represented an act of the Republic, already in the midst of the Civil War. Everything that the Republic represented for a large part of the citizens was expressed in it, with the participation of the most important Spanish artists, who were really relevant at an international level: Picasso with his Guernica, made expressly for the building, The Catalan peasant in revolt by Joan Miró, Montserrat by Julio González, the Mercury Fountain by Calder, and the building by Josep Lluís Sert, with the collaboration of Luis Lacasa commissioned directly by the Government of Madrid. Such a work was entrusted to us despite the little material that was available, because, due to the urgency with which it was built, an ad hoc architectural project was not carried out. We only had a few photographs, a certainly necessary material but it did not enlighten us, for example, about certain materials or colours. Knowledge of Sert's work, interpretation of the documentation found both at the Reina Sofía Art Centre in Madrid and at the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona, and constructive logic, were the tools we used to rebuild the pavilion. The Minister of Culture at the time, Jorge Semprún, promised that during the Games the authentic Guernica would occupy the same place on the wall as in that event. It did not happen that way and the wall was left empty. Out of respect for Picasso's work, we left the wall grey, which is the most abundant part of the painting, and Picasso's signature in white on it (we should remember that the Guernica was never signed). The project falls under the canons of GATPAC rationalism, according to the times in which it was made. It responds to a rectangle of 28.8 by 10.8 and 12 metres high. The entire building is perfectly suited to this modulation. Everyone knows the use for which the pavilion was intended as built by Josep Lluís Sert, that is, as a small showcase structured around a unidirectional itinerary, through which the programmatic content that was exhibited could be seen. It is accessed by a few steps that lead us to the patio, a Mediterranean garment par excellence, and in which countless cultural events were held. Through a ramp, combined with a staircase, the upper level is reached. This part of the building departs from the most classic canons of early rationalism and points to organic forms that shortly after Alvar Aalto rises to its own characteristic within rationalism. From the interior and always along predetermined routes, you go down until you reach the door on the first floor, from where you go outside, to go down a staircase that deposits the visitor at the end of the route. Due to its architectural characteristics, the building seemed intended for a similar use to that of the original in Paris and, consequently, it should be possible to hold art exhibitions, so our reconstruction was forced to provide it with modern installations: electrical, air conditioning, elevator and a basement, where all the machines that such updating required could be placed.

Author: Espinet/Ubach, Arquitectes i Associats

The original location of the Spanish pavilion was in Paris, at Del Trocadéro Avenue. The total area was about 1400 square metres on uneven ground, sloping and with a tree in the centre that was impossible to remove. It is a rectangular ground floor structure plus two floors with a flat roof. The ground floor communicated with a courtyard, which served as an auditorium and could be covered with a tarpaulin. The first floor was accessed by a staircase and the second by a ramp, both exterior, but there was also vertical access inside the building. The pavilion was built practically like an empty container, with movable walls that could be changed according to the needs of each moment. It was built with prefabricated elements, such as corrugated fiberboard or glass panels, dry-jointed inside a steel structure, which is visible, painted white and red. Before entering the pavilion, outside, there was the large sculpture " The Spanish people follow a path that leads to a star " by Alberto Sánchez, and also "la Montserrat" by Julio Gonzàlez and "Femme au vase" by Pablo Picasso. The façade was covered with movable wall murals designed by Josep Renau. Inside, half of the ground floor was occupied by the portico, where Picasso's "Guernica" was located. In front of the painting, in the centre of the portico, was Alexander Calder's "Mercury Fountain." At this level was the visitor information service and the sale of postcards and other publications, in addition to the theatre located in the courtyard. The first floor was intended for information with panels of economic activities, national wealth, statistics, agriculture, education...; the second floor was divided longitudinally with mobile panels and was intended for the visual arts and folk arts. On the access staircase between the first and second floor you could see Joan Miró's large mural "The Catalan farmer in revolution". The International Exhibition of Paris was held in 1937 and the architects Josep Lluís Sert and Luis Lacasa from Madrid were in charge of building the Spanish pavilion. The audiovisual production was commissioned by Luis Buñuel. The purpose of the building was to denounce the war situation in Spain in order to obtain international aid in the defense of the Republic against fascism. It was built very quickly and with very few means, so prefabricated elements were used very quickly to assemble. The pavilion was filled with many avant-garde works of art, such as Picasso's "Guernica", Miró's "The Catalan farmer", Calders' "Mercury Fountain" or " The Spanish people follow a path that leads to a star" by Alberto Sánchez. There were also film screenings, concerts, recitals and theatrical performances. Once the International Exhibition was over, the pavilion was dismantled, but in 1992 the city of Barcelona decided to rebuild it in the Vall d'Hebron district. The architects Antoni Ubach, Miquel Espinet and Josep Maria Hernández León were in charge of making the replica. Since 1994, it has housed the Library of the Republic Pavilion, which has an archive with one of the most important collections in the world on the Second Republic, the Civil War, exile, the Franco regime and the Spanish Transition; it also has an important background on Sovietism and the international political history of the 20th century.

Source: Inventari del Patrimoni Arquitectònic de Catalunya (IPAC)

Authors

How to get there

On the Map

Constellation

Cronology

  1. Pavilion of the Republic for the 1937 Paris International Exhibition

    GATCPAC, Luis Lacasa Navarro, Josep Lluís Sert

    Pavilion of the Republic for the 1937 Paris International Exhibition

  2. Reconstruction of the Pavilion of the Republic

    Espinet/Ubach, Arquitectes i Associats, Miquel Espinet i Mestre, Antoni Ubach i Nuet

    Reconstruction of the Pavilion of the Republic

    The 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games, beyond the merely sporting and urban, represented for the city the recovery of its history, which was interrupted in 1936. It has been the most important event in recent times, thanks to which the city has regained its former splendor. That is why the Olympic Stadium was renamed with the name of the martyred president, Lluís Companys. From this wish of uniting the past with the present, the idea of reconstructing the Spanish pavilion that the Republic commissioned for the 1937 International Exhibition in Paris was born. This pavilion represented an act of the Republic, already in the midst of the Civil War. Everything that the Republic represented for a large part of the citizens was expressed in it, with the participation of the most important Spanish artists, who were really relevant at an international level: Picasso with his Guernica, made expressly for the building, The Catalan peasant in revolt by Joan Miró, Montserrat by Julio González, the Mercury Fountain by Calder, and the building by Josep Lluís Sert, with the collaboration of Luis Lacasa commissioned directly by the Government of Madrid. Such a work was entrusted to us despite the little material that was available, because, due to the urgency with which it was built, an ad hoc architectural project was not carried out. We only had a few photographs, a certainly necessary material but it did not enlighten us, for example, about certain materials or colours. Knowledge of Sert's work, interpretation of the documentation found both at the Reina Sofía Art Centre in Madrid and at the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona, and constructive logic, were the tools we used to rebuild the pavilion. The Minister of Culture at the time, Jorge Semprún, promised that during the Games the authentic Guernica would occupy the same place on the wall as in that event. It did not happen that way and the wall was left empty. Out of respect for Picasso's work, we left the wall grey, which is the most abundant part of the painting, and Picasso's signature in white on it (we should remember that the Guernica was never signed). The project falls under the canons of GATPAC rationalism, according to the times in which it was made. It responds to a rectangle of 28.8 by 10.8 and 12 metres high. The entire building is perfectly suited to this modulation. Everyone knows the use for which the pavilion was intended as built by Josep Lluís Sert, that is, as a small showcase structured around a unidirectional itinerary, through which the programmatic content that was exhibited could be seen. It is accessed by a few steps that lead us to the patio, a Mediterranean garment par excellence, and in which countless cultural events were held. Through a ramp, combined with a staircase, the upper level is reached. This part of the building departs from the most classic canons of early rationalism and points to organic forms that shortly after Alvar Aalto rises to its own characteristic within rationalism. From the interior and always along predetermined routes, you go down until you reach the door on the first floor, from where you go outside, to go down a staircase that deposits the visitor at the end of the route. Due to its architectural characteristics, the building seemed intended for a similar use to that of the original in Paris and, consequently, it should be possible to hold art exhibitions, so our reconstruction was forced to provide it with modern installations: electrical, air conditioning, elevator and a basement, where all the machines that such updating required could be placed.

Audiovisual

  • El pavelló de la República - Va passar aquí | betevé

    4:57

    El pavelló de la República - Va passar aquí | betevé